14 Gems of Running Advice to Remember

Jennifer Purdie
by Jennifer Purdie
Share it:
14 Gems of Running Advice to Remember

We asked 14 runners for the “best advice they have ever received on running.” If you need a little help to get off the couch or out of the office to start running, the following counsel might serve you well:

1. WEIGHTS ARE YOUR FRIEND

“Incorporate strength training into your running routine. When I started to strength train on a regular basis, I didn’t have to run as many miles to get the same results, and I have been injury-free.”

—Katie Kissane, MS, RD and owner of NoCo Sports Nutrition and Fitness

2. THINK ABOUT TECHNIQUE

“When you reach the summit of a hill or an incline, make sure to concentrate on re-increasing the reach of your strides.”

—Patrick Williams, VP of global marketing at zeamo

3. TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE COMMUNITY

“Talk to other runners or people who have trained for something like [what you’re doing] before. See if they have advice or if they’ve experienced something similar in their training. It was an incredible help for me and it likely will be for them, too.”

Ellyn Schinke, MS, lifestyle management, confidence coach and author

4. ENJOY THE RUN

“Running is your time. Not everything is a competition or race with yourself.”

—Rhonda Vetere, president of nThrive, a global healthcare organization

5. HAVE A PLAN

“Always follow a personalized injury-prevention plan that consists of cross-training exercises and stretches that help avoid injuries you may be high-risk for (i.e., if you are pre-disposed to IT band syndrome, follow a specific routine that increases IT band flexibility).”

—Rachel Soper Sanders, CEO and co-founder of Paging Patch

6. MIND YOUR NUTRITION

“When you eat consistent meals full of fiber, protein, vitamins and minerals, you will have the energy you need to stay active, recover quickly and perform at a high level.”

—Matt Forsman, aka Marathon Matt, in-house couch at SportMe

7. LISTEN TO YOUR BODY

“Running is a mental game, especially for endurance races. Your mind will tell you to quit long before your body is unable to go any further. Focus on putting one foot in front of the other and keep moving forward. You’ll reach the finish line before you know it.”

—Antonio DeRose, ultrarunner, owner of mjfitnut.com

8. KEEP THINGS FRESH

“Set yourself new goals each season. This sounds so simple, but it is so hard.”

—Jill McKay, owner of Narrow Road Fitness

9. RECOVERY IS KEY

“Make sure you’re getting enough sleep. The average person sleeps around 6.5 hours per night, but needs 7–8 hours of sleep. For people who run, sleep is especially crucial for endurance, mental resolve and recovery.”

—Chris Brantner, avid runner, founder and certified sleep science coach at SleepZoo.com

10. SET SMART GOALS

“Break any race/run down into manageable, bitesize chunks.”

—Jason Kurtz, CNN journalist and CEO/founder of Captains Practice

11. PACE YOURSELF

“Don’t go out fast. Don’t let the speed of the crowd dictate your pace.”

—Susan Clayton, founder of  WhitePaws RunMitts


READ MORE > 5 PRO RUNNERS SHARE THEIR MORNING ROUTINE


12. RUN YOUR RACE

“It’s so easy to get caught up in what everyone else is doing and succumb to groupthink.  But when I run my race, it frees me from worrying about what others think and sets me up to do something extraordinary.

Martise Moore, author of “Stay Awesome Sports Journal: Crush It All Season Long”

13. BREATHE

“Take deep breaths through the belly and diaphragm rather than through the upper chest. This sentence has improved my performance tremendously.”

—Kylie Santos, public relations exec at Excellence Health Inc.

14. WE ARE ALL INDIVIDUALS

“Start where you are and build from there. It was so helpful to hear because I joined a local running group thinking I’d be running with other first-time marathon runners. No, this was a group that had elite, Ironman triathletes in it. So, I started where I was and built up my miles and my pace, week after week.”

Heidi McBain, MA, LPC and  author of “Life Transitions: Personal Stories of Hope Through Life’s Most Difficult Challenges and Changes”

About the Author

Jennifer Purdie
Jennifer Purdie

Jennifer is a Southern California-based freelance writer who covers topics such as health, fitness, lifestyle and travel for both national and regional publications. She runs marathons across the world and is an Ironman finisher. She is also a certified personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. You can follow her on Twitter @jenpurdie.

Related

Never Miss a Post!

Turn on MapMyRun desktop notifications and stay up to date on the latest running advice.

Great!

Click the 'Allow' Button Above

Awesome!

You're all set.